Vegan recipes for an active, healthy life.

Where do Vegans get Protein

Where do Vegans get Protein

There is a lot of confusion about protein, especially when it comes to eating a vegetarian diet. “But where do you get your protein?”, people often ask. The answer is that vegetables, fruits and grains have protein. Eating animals is not the only resource for protein. The argument comes when people debate the amino acid profile of animal protein vs plant protein because the amino acid profiles are different, as would be expected.

The Amino Acid Profile of Meat Protein vs. Plant Protein

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. There are many different amino acids. Nine of these are essential, which means we must ingest them.The human body does not, in any combination, make these 9 essential amino acids. We have to eat or take supplements with these 9 essential amino acids. In the past, the argument was that plant protein was “incomplete”. We now know this to be false. The reason this accusation arose is because some plants do not have all 9 essential amino acids. However, since we do not eat only one food item every day, all day for our entire lives, ingesting all 9 essential amino acids through the course of one day or one week is not only probable, but entirely likely. Besides, fruits and vegetables are loaded with dozens of other essential micronutrients that animal proteins lack. Not to mention that animal proteins contain an abundant amount of cholesterol, saturated fat and other questionable additives like hormones, antibiotics and excessive amounts of sodium.

What Vegetables have the Most Protein

To help give you some perspective on the high protein levels in vegetables, check out this list below. And don’t let anyone ever tell you that fruits and vegetables lack protein. What they lack is saturated fat, cholesterol, excess sodium, hormones and antibiotics which of course, is great news!

FoodGrams of ProteinMeasurement
Lentils18 g1 cup
Black Beans15 g1 cup
Kidney Beans13 g1 cup
Chickpeas12 g1 cup
Soybeans28 g1 cup
Tofu12 g 1/2 cup
Quinoa9 g1 cup
Brown Rice5 g1 cup
Oats7 g1/2 cup
Peas9 g1 cup
Edamame16 g1 cup
Spinach5 g1 cup
Broccoli4 g1 cup
Asparagus4 g1 cup
Hemp seeds11 g1/4 cup
Soy milk9 g1 cup
Almonds15 g1/2 cup
Peanut butter8 g2 Tbsp
Chia seeds6 g 2 Tbsp
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